Freitag, 20. Dezember 2013

Artikel 9: Tai chi for osteoarthritis: a systematic review

Myeong Soo Lee & Max H. Pittler & Edzard Ernst

Clin Rheumatol (2008)

Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate data from controlled clinical trials testing the effectiveness of tai chi for treating osteoarthritis. Systematic searches were con- ducted on MEDLINE, AMED, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycInfo, The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 2, the UK National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov, Korean medical databases, the Qigong and Energy database and Chinese medical databases (until June 2007). Hand searches included conference proceed- ings and our own files. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication.

All controlled trials of tai chi for patients with osteoarthritis were considered for inclusion. Methodological quality was assessed using the Jadad score. Five randomised clinical trials (RCTs) and seven non-randomised controlled clinical trials (CCTs) met all inclusion criteria. Five RCTs assessed the effectiveness of tai chi on pain of osteoarthritis (OA). Two RCTs suggested significant pain reduction on visual analog scale or Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) compared to routine treatment and an attention control program in knee OA. Three RCTs did not report significant pain reduction on multiple sites pain. Four RCTs tested tai chi for physical functions. Two of these RCTs suggested improvement of physical function on activity of daily living or WOMAC compared to routine treatment or wait-list control, whilst two other RCTs failed to do so.

In conclusion, there is some encouraging evidence suggesting that tai chi may be effective for pain control in patients with knee OA. However, the evidence is not convincing for pain reduction or improvement of physical function. Future RCTs should assess larger patient samples for longer treatment periods and use appropriate controls.

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Samstag, 14. Dezember 2013

Artikel 8: Tai Chi and Chronic Pain - A Review

Philip W.H. Peng, MBBS, FRCPC, 2012

Abstract: In the last 2 decades, a growing body of research aimed at investigating the health benefits of Tai Chi in various chronic health conditions has been recognized in the literature. This article reviewed the history, the philosophy, and the evidence for the role of Tai Chi in a few selected chronic pain conditions. The ancient health art of Tai Chi con- tributes to chronic pain management in 3 major areas: adaptive exercise, mind-body interaction, and meditation. Trials examining the health benefit of Tai Chi in chronic pain conditions are mostly low quality. Only 5 pain conditions were reviewed: osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, rheuma- toid arthritis, low back pain, and headache. Of these, Tai Chi seems to be an effective intervention in osteoarthritis, low back pain, and fibromy- algia. The limitations of the Tai Chi study design and suggestions for the direction of future research are also discussed.
(Reg Anesth Pain Med 2012;37: 372Y382)

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